Chiropractic ABN’s

25 Dec

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-uvrc7-a2bf2d

Chiropractic ABN’s

 

Welcome to Billing Buddies YouTube and Podcast series. 

In this episode, we will be discussing Chiropractic ABNs. 

First, let’s define an ABN.  An ABN is an abbreviation of a Medicare form known as the Advanced Beneficiary Notice.  Medicare requires providers give an ABN to beneficiaries if the Medicare services they are proposing to deliver is suspected to not be covered by Medicare.  If the service is statutorily excluded from the Medicare program, such as exams and therapies for chiropractic care, Medicare does not require an ABN be presented to the patient.  Medicare only requires an ABN be presented on services that can be covered under the program such as CMT’s for chiropractic care.    

It’s very important when receiving information that you can look up and research the data yourself.  For this reason, whenever possible, Billing Buddies will share the source for you to review.  The information from this presentation came from www.CMS.gov.  You can type ABN in the upper right-hand corner of the screen and search for information on Advance Beneficiary Notices or ABN’s.

Now, let’s take a look at the form.  There are several boxes to complete.  You can see items A through J are to be completed by the provider and the patient.  Let’s review the form.

     Field A = Enter the Notifiers Information – This is the clinic and staff member presenting the ABN.

     Field B = Enter the Patient’s Name

     Field C = Enter the Patient’s Medicare Number

     Field D = Enter the Service to be provided.  In Chiropractic care, this would be the CMT.  You could enter codes 98940 – 98942 in this field.

     Field E = Enter the Reason Medicare may not pay.  In Chiropractic care, the most common reason would be that the CMT was considered maintenance care.  But, review your Local Coverage Determination from your carrier for a complete list.

     Field F = Enter the estimated cost.  If more than one service is listed in Box D, enter the estimated cost for all services.

     Field G = All the fields on the ABN are important, but this one is especially important.  Patient’s are required to pick one of the three options.  The provider may not complete this portion of the form or it will invalidate the form.

    Field H = This is a field where additional information may be provided.

    Field I = This requires the patient or representative to sign the form.  If a representative signs the form, have the representative write “representative” in parenthesis after his/her signature.

    Field J = The patient or representative must date the form when signed.

 

That completes our ABN video.  Thank you for watching.  Please subscribe to our channel and like our videos. Also, please comment if you would like other videos presented and suggestions on topics.  

Billing Buddies has been assisting providers since 1994 and offers billing services, training and consulting.  For more information, call or text 612.432.2366 or email bonnie@billingbuddies.com.

 

 

Chiropractic ABN’s

25 Dec

Welcome to Billing Buddies YouTube and Podcast series.

In this episode, we will be discussing Chiropractic ABNs.

First, let’s define an ABN.  An ABN is an abbreviation of a Medicare form known as the Advanced Beneficiary Notice.  Medicare requires providers give an ABN to beneficiaries if the Medicare services they are proposing to deliver is suspected to not be covered by Medicare.  If the service is statutorily excluded from the Medicare program, such as exams and therapies for chiropractic care, Medicare does not require an ABN be presented to the patient.  Medicare only requires an ABN be presented on services that can be covered under the program such as CMT’s for chiropractic care.

It’s very important when receiving information that you can look up and research the data yourself.  For this reason, whenever possible, Billing Buddies will share the source for you to review.  The information from this presentation came from www.CMS.gov.  You can type ABN in the upper right-hand corner of the screen and search for information on Advance Beneficiary Notices or ABN’s.

Now, let’s take a look at the form.  There are several boxes to complete.  You can see items A through J are to be completed by the provider and the patient.  Let’s review the form.

Field A = Enter the Notifiers Information – This is the clinic and staff member presenting the ABN.

Field B = Enter the Patient’s Name

Field C = Enter the Patient’s Medicare Number

Field D = Enter the Service to be provided.  In Chiropractic care, this would be the CMT.  You could enter codes 98940 – 98942 in this field.

Field E = Enter the Reason Medicare may not pay.  In Chiropractic care, the most common reason would be that the CMT was considered maintenance care.  But, review your Local Coverage Determination from your carrier for a complete list.

Field F = Enter the estimated cost.  If more than one service is listed in Box D, enter the estimated cost for all services.

Field G = All the fields on the ABN are important, but this one is especially important.  Patient’s are required to pick one of the three options.  The provider may not complete this portion of the form or it will invalidate the form.

Field H = This is a field where additional information may be provided.

Field I = This requires the patient or representative to sign the form.  If a representative signs the form, have the representative write “representative” in parenthesis after his/her signature.

Field J = The patient or representative must date the form when signed.

That completes our ABN video.  Thank you for watching.  Please subscribe to our channel and like our videos. Also, please comment if you would like other videos presented and suggestions on topics.

Billing Buddies has been assisting providers since 1994 and offers billing services, training and consulting.  For more information, call or text 612.432.2366 or email bonnie@billingbuddies.com.

 

Quickly Learn ICD-10 Updates and Revisions

11 Oct

Each year on October 1st, the ICD-10 codes are updated and revised.  Watch our YouTube Video that explains how to quickly learn the updates and revisions.

 

Chiropractors Must Bill Medicare

28 Apr

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-9g2gd-9030e6

Chiropractic is one of the specialties that are required to have a contract in order to treat Medicare patients. If a chiropractor does not have a Medicare contract, they are required to refer Medicare patients to another chiropractor who does have a Medicare Contract. This is true even for chiropractic services that are non-covered by Medicare, such as maintenance care.

This rule can be found in Chapter 15 of the Medicare Benefit Policy Manual in Section 40.4. It states; “the opt out law does not define “physician” to include chiropractors; therefore, they may not opt out of Medicare and provide services under private contract.”
There has been a confusing notion in the chiropractic profession that chiropractors can have the patient sign an Advance Beneficiary Notice and bill the patient without being a Medicare provider. This isn’t true.

The No Opt Out Rule for chiropractors in the Medicare program means a chiropractor can treat a Medicare patient either as a participating provider or a non-participating provider, but either way, the chiropractor has one of the two contracts with Medicare; a participating contract or a non-participating contract.

A Medicare participating contract means the chiropractor has physically signed a contract with Medicare, agrees to abide by all the rules of the program, bills Medicare and accepts assignment from Medicare. A Medicare non-participating contract means the chiropractor has physically signed a contract with Medicare, agrees to abide by all the rules of the program, but has a choice whether or not to accept assignment.

There is one more catch, a non-participating Medicare provider is still limited by how much the patient may be charged. There is a limiting fee schedule whereby the chiropractor may only bill the Medicare patient up to 115% of the allowed Medicare fee even if the chiropractor does not accept assignment and the patient receives payment directly from Medicare.

There is a good handout published by CMS called “Misinformation on Chiropractic Services” that covers this rule and many others. For a copy of this handout, search for it at http://www.cms.gov and it will be readily available. If you are unable to find it, please email bonnie@billingbuddies.com with the subject line stating; “Misinformation on Chiropractic Services” and you will receive a return copy.

Billing Buddies ® Bullet Points is brought to you by Billing Buddies. Visit us on the web at http://www.billingbuddies.com. I’m your host, Bonnie J. Flom. I have 34 years of medical billing experience and am a Certified Medical Reimbursement Specialist through the American Medical Billing Association. If you have any questions or comments, please email bonnie@billingbuddies.com or call or text 612.432.2366. Our goal at Billing Buddies is to help optimize and expedite our providers’ reimbursement so they are better able to serve their clients. If you should need medical billing or training services, please contact us. Have a great day and happy billing.

 

Chiropractors Must Bill Medicare

28 Apr

Billing Buddies YouTube Video

Chiropractic is one of the specialties that are required to have a contract in order to treat Medicare patients. If a chiropractor does not have a Medicare contract, they are required to refer Medicare patients to another chiropractor who does have a Medicare Contract. This is true even for chiropractic services that are non-covered by Medicare, such as maintenance care.

This rule can be found in Chapter 15 of the Medicare Benefit Policy Manual in Section 40.4. It states; “the opt out law does not define “physician” to include chiropractors; therefore, they may not opt out of Medicare and provide services under private contract.”
There has been a confusing notion in the chiropractic profession that chiropractors can have the patient sign an Advance Beneficiary Notice and bill the patient without being a Medicare provider. This isn’t true.

The No Opt Out Rule for chiropractors in the Medicare program means a chiropractor can treat a Medicare patient either as a participating provider or a non-participating provider, but either way, the chiropractor has one of the two contracts with Medicare; a participating contract or a non-participating contract.

A Medicare participating contract means the chiropractor has physically signed a contract with Medicare, agrees to abide by all the rules of the program, bills Medicare and accepts assignment from Medicare. A Medicare non-participating contract means the chiropractor has physically signed a contract with Medicare, agrees to abide by all the rules of the program, but has a choice whether or not to accept assignment.

There is one more catch, a non-participating Medicare provider is still limited by how much the patient may be charged. There is a limiting fee schedule whereby the chiropractor may only bill the Medicare patient up to 115% of the allowed Medicare fee even if the chiropractor does not accept assignment and the patient receives payment directly from Medicare.

There is a good handout published by CMS called “Misinformation on Chiropractic Services” that covers this rule and many others. For a copy of this handout, search for it at http://www.cms.gov and it will be readily available. If you are unable to find it, please email bonnie@billingbuddies.com with the subject line stating; “Misinformation on Chiropractic Services” and you will receive a return copy.

Billing Buddies ® Bullet Points is brought to you by Billing Buddies. Visit us on the web at http://www.billingbuddies.com. I’m your host, Bonnie J. Flom. I have 34 years of medical billing experience and am a Certified Medical Reimbursement Specialist through the American Medical Billing Association. If you have any questions or comments, please email bonnie@billingbuddies.com or call or text 612.432.2366. Our goal at Billing Buddies is to help optimize and expedite our providers’ reimbursement so they are better able to serve their clients. If you should need medical billing or training services, please contact us. Have a great day and happy billing.

 

Replacing 59 Modifier with X-Codes

28 Apr

Watch our YouTube Video

Are you still using Modifier 59? CMS replaced modifier 59 on January 1, 2015.

First, what is Modifier 59? Modifier 59 is used in medical billing to override the National Correct Coding Initiative (NCCI) edits which CMS created in the first place. Some services are included or bundled into other services and should not be billed separately. However, there are circumstances where it is appropriate to bill the services separately and the 59 modifier has been used historically to tell insurance companies this is one of those circumstances.

You can find the complete details on the creation of the new codes at http://www.cms.gov by searching for the MLN Matters article MM8863. Please review this article in detail to gain a complete understanding of the changes.

The new modifiers used to replace the 59 modifier all begin with a letter X.

XE = Separate Encounter, A Service That Is Distinct Because It Occurred During A Separate Encounter,
XS = Separate Structure, A Service That Is Distinct Because It Was Performed On A Separate Organ/Structure,
XP = Separate Practitioner, A Service That Is Distinct Because It Was Performed By A Different Practitioner, and
XU = Unusual Non-Overlapping Service, The Use Of A Service That Is Distinct Because It Does Not Overlap Usual Components Of The Main Service.

CMS will continue to recognize the 59 modifier, but notes that Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) instructions state that the 59 modifier should not be used when a more descriptive modifier is available. While CMS will continue to recognize the 59 modifier in many circumstances, they may selectively require a more specific X modifier for billing certain codes at high risk for incorrect billing. If you haven’t done so already, it would be a good time to review and adopt the X modifiers.

Billing Buddies ® Bullet Points is brought to you by Billing Buddies. Visit us on the web at http://www.billingbuddies.com. I’m your host, Bonnie J. Flom. I have 34 years of medical billing experience and am a Certified Medical Reimbursement Specialist through the American Medical Billing Association. If you have any questions or comments, please email bonnie@billingbuddies.com or call or text us at 612.432.2366. Our goal at Billing Buddies is to help optimize and expedite our providers reimbursement so they are better able to serve their clients. If you should need medical billing or training services, please contact us. Have a great day and happy billing.

 

Replacing Modifier 59 with X-Codes

28 Apr

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-7sitf-902cc5

Are you still using Modifier 59? CMS replaced modifier 59 on January 1, 2015.

First, what is Modifier 59? Modifier 59 is used in medical billing to override the National Correct Coding Initiative (NCCI) edits which CMS created in the first place. Some services are included or bundled into other services and should not be billed separately. However, there are circumstances where it is appropriate to bill the services separately and the 59 modifier has been used historically to tell insurance companies this is one of those circumstances.

You can find the complete details on the creation of the new codes at http://www.cms.gov by searching for the MLN Matters article MM8863. Please review this article in detail to gain a complete understanding of the changes.

The new modifiers used to replace the 59 modifier all begin with a letter X.

XE = Separate Encounter, A Service That Is Distinct Because It Occurred During A Separate Encounter,
XS = Separate Structure, A Service That Is Distinct Because It Was Performed On A Separate Organ/Structure,
XP = Separate Practitioner, A Service That Is Distinct Because It Was Performed By A Different Practitioner, and
XU = Unusual Non-Overlapping Service, The Use Of A Service That Is Distinct Because It Does Not Overlap Usual Components Of The Main Service.

CMS will continue to recognize the 59 modifier, but notes that Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) instructions state that the 59 modifier should not be used when a more descriptive modifier is available. While CMS will continue to recognize the 59 modifier in many circumstances, they may selectively require a more specific X modifier for billing certain codes at high risk for incorrect billing. If you haven’t done so already, it would be a good time to review and adopt the X modifiers.

Billing Buddies ® Bullet Points is brought to you by Billing Buddies. Visit us on the web at http://www.billingbuddies.com. I’m your host, Bonnie J. Flom. I have 34 years of medical billing experience and am a Certified Medical Reimbursement Specialist through the American Medical Billing Association. If you have any questions or comments, please email bonnie@billingbuddies.com or call or text us at 612.432.2366. Our goal at Billing Buddies is to help optimize and expedite our providers reimbursement so they are better able to serve their clients. If you should need medical billing or training services, please contact us. Have a great day and happy billing.